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Family Care Dental Clinic

10 mistakes you’re making with your teeth

10 mistakes you’re making with your teeth

Taking care of your pearly whites isn’t rocket science, but it’s easy to slip into habits that could cause heartache—er, toothache—in the long run. We got the latest on giving your teeth the TLC they need from two New York City pros: Alice Lee, DDS, an assistant professor in the Department of Dentistry for Montefiore Health System, and Alison Newgard, DDS, an assistant professor of clinical dentistry at Columbia University College of Dentistry, will clue you in on where you could be going wrong.

1. Multitasking while you brush

Every minute in the morning feels precious, so it’s tempting to brush your teeth in the shower or while scrolling through your Twitter feed. “To each his own,” says Dr. Newgard, “but I prefer patients to be in front of a mirror, over the sink; you can be sure to hit all the surfaces of your teeth, and you’ll do a more thorough job when you’re not distracted.” Better to leave the bathroom a few minutes later having given proper attention to each step of your prep.

2. Brushing right after your morning OJ

Like to start your day with a glass of orange juice—or oh-so-trendy lemon water? Brushing right afterward can wear away your enamel. “The acidic environment weakens the teeth enamel and erosion can occur during this vulnerable period,” Dr. Lee says, “so neutralize your mouth first by drinking milk or water, or rinsing with a baking soda solution—or just waiting 30 minutes.” The same goes for vomiting, Dr. Lee says, since that’s acidic, too. (Gross but true!) If you’ve thrown up, be sure to rinse before scrubbing out your mouth.

3. Ignoring your daily (or nightly) grind.

While mild bruxism—that is, clenching your teeth or grinding your jaw—might not seem like a big deal, severe cases can lead to everything from chipped and worn teeth to headaches, jaw trouble, and even changes in facial appearance. It’s hard to know if you grind your teeth at night if a partner doesn’t tip you off, of course, but if you experience telltale signs such as jaw soreness or a dull, constant headache, make haste to the dentist; he or she can fit you with a mouth guard to protect you from additional damage.

4. Smoking

You already know smoking is bad for your lungs and heart. In case you need another reason to quit smoking: Besides the bad breath and stained teeth, smoking is one of the most significant risk factors associated with the development of gum disease (and the gum recession, bone loss, and tooth loss that come with it), according to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. Worse yet, smoking can also lower your chances for successful treatment if you’ve already got gum disease, since nicotine compromises your body’s ability to fight infection.

5. Storing your wet toothbrush in a travel case

It’s important to stow your brush somewhere sanitary before you tuck it into your luggage for a trip—and equally important to set it free once you unpack. “Bacteria thrives in moist environments,” says Dr. Lee. “While you should use a cover or case during transport, make sure you take your toothbrush out and allow it to air dry when you reach your destination.” No stand-up holder in your hotel room? If you’ve got a cup for drinking water, that’ll do just fine.

6. Drinking apple cider vinegar

According to assorted Hollywood celebrities and natural health experts, drinking unfiltered apple-cider vinegar can have near-miraculous effects on your insides. Research doesn’t support those claims, but dentists are sure of one thing: The acetic acid in the vinegar is terrible for your tooth enamel. When it comes downing ACV (as proponents call it), Dr. Newgard says, even a good rinse with water afterward might not mitigate the quaff’s potential damage: “I just think you shouldn’t use it at all.” (Our suggestion: Instead of drinking apple cider vinegar straight, try it in a vinaigrette, or use it to soothe sunburn or get chlorine out of your hair.)

7. Reaching for the wrong mouth rinse

There are as many ways to wash that gunk right outta your mouth as there are types of gunk to have in your mouth. “Cosmetic” rinses, for example, will merely control bad breath and leave you with a pleasant taste in your mouth. Therapeutic rinses with ingredients like antimicrobial agents and fluoride, on the other hand, can actually help reduce gingivitis, cavities, plaque, and bad breath. (Fluoride rinses aren’t recommended for children under 6, as they might swallow instead of spitting.)

8. Ditching your retainer

If you once had braces, whether as a teen or as an adult, it’s smart to keep wearing your retainer for as long as your orthodontist recommends—which may mean several nights a week, forever. “A patient will have perfect teeth from braces,” Dr. Newgard says, “and then they won’t wear a retainer at night and their teeth will shift and they’ll be unhappy all over again.” Honor thy adolescent self, and keep those teeth in line for good. (Got a fixed retainer? Be sure to keep the device clean: “They can be plaque traps,” Dr. Newgard says.)

9. Using a brush that’s too hard

Like wooden toothpicks, hard-bristled brushes are tough-looking instruments that tend to cause more problems than they solve. Effective as they might seem, “harder bristles can erode your enamel,” Dr. Lee says. “I only recommend soft or extra-soft toothbrushes.” Research indicates that your gums will suffer from tough brushes as well: A 2011 study published in the Journal of Periodontology found that while hard-bristled toothbrushes removed plaque, they were also more likely than softer brushes to cause gingivitis and tissue damage. Ouch!

10. Skipping dentist appointments

Hate sitting in the dentist’s chair? The very best trick for short-circuiting anxiety about going to the dentist is—surprise—going to the dentist. “Most patients who don’t like to come in feel that way because when they do, they need a lot of work,” Dr. Newgard says. “If you’re in every six months for your checkups, you’re less likely to run into problems.” Moreover, dentists are beginning to employ everything from serene, spa-like settings to animal-assisted therapy (that is, a gentle dog who sits beside you at your appointment) to alleviate patient discomfort; you can find a dental practice in your comfort zone.

Contact Family Care Dental Clinic for your consultation today!

We at Family Care Dental Clinic offer our clients a wide range of comprehensive dental services for the whole family. Our dentists can help everyone in your family understand the importance of proper oral hygiene over time and the positive effects it has on your health. At Family Care Dental Clinic, we treat our clients to a soothing environment where they can receive quality dental care no matter what their needs are. Call (604) 987-3545 or write us at info@familycaredentalclinic.com to schedule an appointment with a member of our excellent team!

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