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Family Care Dental Clinic

Teeth Whitening Anyone?

Teeth Whitening Anyone?

Teeth whitening

In most cases, the natural colour of teeth is within a range of light greyish-yellow shades. Teeth naturally darken with age and their appearance can be affected by the accumulation of surface stains acquired from the use of tobacco products and the consumption of certain foods or drinks.
In addition, the perception of the colour of teeth is severely affected by skin tone and make-up. Independent of the real colour of their teeth, people with darker skin or who use dark makeup will look like they have brighter teeth.

Although teeth are not naturally meant to be completely white, many Canadians want a brighter smile. Responding to this desire, a wide range of “whitening” options has become available to consumers. These products fall into two main categories: surface whiteners and bleaches.
It should be noted that claims related to tooth whitening are seen as cosmetic in nature by Health Canada. These claims must be accurate, so as not to mislead the public. However, the regulator tolerates some puffery or exaggeration. As a consequence, the results of whitening treatment may not be as convincing as consumers originally expected.

Surface Whiteners

These products use special abrasives to improve the product’s ability to remove surface stains. Most products in this category are either toothpastes or chewing gums. Because the special abrasives in these whitening products are often only finer versions of what is used in regular toothpastes, they are unlikely to cause excessive tooth wear. However, the effectiveness of these products is limited to surface stains and should not be used as a substitute for professional cleaning.
The awkward irony of halitosis is that many people aren’t aware that they have it. This is because the cells in the nose that are responsible for the sense of smell actually become unresponsive to the continuous stream of bad odour. If you have bad breath, you may need to be told, or you may notice the negative reaction of other people when you’re just too close!

Diagnosing Halitosis

It’s easy to self-diagnose bad breath. You can lick your wrist, let it dry for a few seconds and smell the area, or cup your hands over your mouth and sniff your own breath. If you need a second opinion, ask a friend, family member, or your physician or dentist.

Treating and Preventing Halitosis

The manufacturers of mints and mouthwashes have made an industry out of the public’s desire for fresh breath. These products promise that your breath can be made sweet-smelling and “minty fresh.” However, they’re only temporarily helpful at best in controlling breath odours. In fact, many often contain sugar and alcohol, which may lead to tooth decay and may aggravate certain mouth conditions.

Proper care of the mouth and teeth and regular visits to the dentist are important, and are the most effective way to control bad breath. Regular brushing, flossing, rinsing, and tongue scraping can help prevent problems.
Sometimes, halitosis may be caused by illnesses such as lung disease, impaired emptying of the stomach, liver failure, or kidney failure. In this case, treating the underlying condition can improve the halitosis as well.

Here are some tips for getting rid of bad breath:

  • Brush your teeth 3 times a day and floss once daily.
  • Clean your tongue before bedtime by scraping with a plastic tongue cleaner or brushing gently.
  • Prevent hunger breath by eating regularly and avoiding fasting or skipping meals.
  • Ask your dentist to recommend a specific cleaning system that can help clean your mouth more thoroughly than with just regular brushing.
  • Keep your nose and sinuses clean.
  • Stimulate saliva flow with acidic fruits such as oranges and lemons or sugarless citric gums and candy.
  • Eat more fibrous foods. Chew fibrous vegetables such as parsley and wintergreen to stimulate saliva flow.
  • Drink at least 8 glasses of water daily to keep your mouth moist and to help rinse away odour-forming bacteria.
  • Decrease alcohol and coffee intake.
  • Ask your doctor or pharmacist whether your medications are causing problems of dry mouth that may be leading to bad breath.

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